By Tank Murdoch

(TNS) Americans who have watched the likes of Hillary Clinton, James Comey, Andrew McCabe, and James Wolfe get away with mishandling classified material and/or leaking it to the media will be happy to know their ‘suspicion’ that a two-tiered system of justice exists has been fully vindicated.



It turns out that the Justice Department does know how to prosecute egregious violations of the Espionage Act and other laws protecting national security. It just depends on who you are, obviously.



In September, Reuters reported that a Defense Intelligence Agency analyst was arrested as he arrived for work by federal agents who charged him with leaking classified materials to a pair of journalists.

The brief report noted that “Henry Kyle Frese passed along to a journalist with whom he was apparently romantically involved” classified intel that “appeared in at least eight different news stories, the Justice Department alleged in an indictment unsealed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.”

Now, that case has come to its conclusion. The Epoch Times reports that Frese, now 31, has pleaded guilty “to the willful transmission of top-secret national defense information to journalists,” charges that carry up to 10 years in prison:

Frese was arrested when he arrived to work at a DIA facility in Virginia in October last year where he worked as a counterterrorism analyst. 

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The 31-year-old—who held top-secret government security clearance—was accused of helping the journalists research information on a classified United States government computer system and providing them with classified information from five intelligence reports that he accessed, according to court documents.

Some of the information was related to the capabilities of certain foreign countries’ weapon systems. DOJ officials said the information in the report was outside the scope of Frese’s job duties as an analyst.

According to the government, the first journalist, with whom he was having a relationship, published eight articles based on the information he provided. He then gave additional information to a second journalist as a way of helping the first journalist advance their career.

Also:

Prosecutors also said that Frese conducted searches on classified government systems for information regarding the classified topics he discussed with the two journalists on at least 30 separate occasions. He also communicated with an employee of an overseas consulting group via social media and provided classified information to a consultant on at least two occasions, officials said.

“Frese violated the trust placed in him by the American people when he disclosed sensitive national security information for personal gain,” Assistant Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers said in a statement.

“He alerted our country’s adversaries to sensitive national defense information, putting the nation’s security at risk,” Demers added.

Robert Wells, acting assistant director of the FBI’s Counterintelligence Division, agreed.

“Mr. Frese violated his sworn oath to protect the American people and uphold the Constitution of the United States by using his access to the United States’ most sensitive information and steal state secrets for nothing more than personal gain,” he said.

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The prosecution comes as the Trump administration is stepping up enforcement of national security laws and cut down on leaks of classified materials. Before he left office, then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions prosecuted six cases.

The point is, these laws exist for every American. And it’s obvious the government knows how to investigation and prosecute violations of these laws.


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But obviously, they don’t apply to every American. At least yet.

If President Trump really wants to ‘send a message,’ he will ensure these laws are applied equally —  and before the statute of limitations run out.

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