By Tank Murdoch

(TNS) We’re a pretty law-and-order bunch around here, but given how the federal judiciary has continually infringed on the rights and the authorities vested in the Executive Branch, we look at this story as a ‘win’ for justice.



In a development that flew under the radar this week, what with all of the impeachment shenanigans in D.C., the Customs and Border Protection agency appears to have flouted a federal judge’s order to refrain from deporting an Iranian who may have been an “enforcer” for the regime.

Red State noted:

On Sunday, an Iranian holding a student visa to study at Northeastern University, 24-year-old Mohammad Shahab Dehghani Hossein Abadi, was detained by Customs and Border Protection (CPB) as he tried to pass through passport control at Boston’s Logan International Airport.

The bad news part of the story is that we’re still allowing a state sponsor of terrorism to send children of its ruling class to American universities. Kind of hard to believe that we still allow this to go on given the Iran’s attacks on US citizens and interests.

The first part of the good news is that CPB had received orders to prevent his entrance and put him on the first thing smoking that was heading out of the country. Somehow the ACLU and, it seems, the pro-terror non-declared-agent-of-a-foreign-government organization beloved of Ben Rhodes and the Obama White House, the National Iranian American Council, got involved.

The case was immediately pushed in front of a federal judge who summarily blocked the CPB from doing its constitutional and legal duty, ordering the agency to withhold deportation for at least 48 hours.

Nevertheless, Mohammad Shahab Dehghani Hossein Abadi, was placed aboard an Air France airliner bound for Paris, which left his supporters alone in a courtroom wondering where he was and the Marxists who represent one of the original 13 colonies incensed (as usual) that an Iranian was ‘dealt with.’

‘We won’t stand for this.’ Well, too late, congresswoman.

Meanwhile, the federal judge in the cherry-picked court hadn’t much to say about it:

In court Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Richard Stearns dismissed the case, declaring it moot because Abadi had already been deported. He added that he did not believe he had the authority to order CBP to allow Abadi to return.

He doesn’t. No federal judge does. The law is clear on how the CBP operates, and it was constitutionally passed and signed by the Legislative and Executive Branches.

Now again, we’re a law-and-order bunch here, but enough Judicial Branch political activism already.

And yet, there is more to the story, perhaps. The Iranian ex-pat community living in the U.S. believes Abadi was actually an “enforcer” for the authoritarian regime in Tehran. Enforcers are sent wherever Iranian communities are found so they can report back to the regime on their activities and keep them in line by threatening family members back home.

https://twitter.com/Fakhravar/status/1219648386925760513

If he really is a Basij, that helps explain why it took nearly a year for his investigation to be completed. Then again, it also represents the futility of trying to do a background check on someone who is a member of a regime that is technically warning with your country and isn’t going to be cooperative or honest with you.

“The revocation of the visa after it was granted only a week ago is not part of some grand scheme to exclude Iranians from studying here but speaks to some new intelligence about him or some new interpretation of existing information,” Red State noted. “It would also explain why the federal judge was so monumentally unconcerned about being ignored.”

Once again, though, the only people who seem concerned about Abadi’s deportation are…Democrats.

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