(NationalSentinel) U.S. Navy SEAL Carl Higbie has composed a letter hitting back at a Pentagon command structure for sacrificing, or attempting to sacrifice, some of the military’s most lethal warriors at the altar of political correctness.

Higbie, who joined the Navy in 2003 and has deployed twice to Iraq as an elite member of the world’s most elite force, is well aware of how modern warfare works and he’s trying to sound an alarm that there is trouble within the ranks — only not the kind the PC Navy brass at the Pentagon see.

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“The top US Navy SEAL, Rear Adm. Collin Green just sent a message to the Teams that was titled ‘We have a problem,’ and he’s not wrong,” the former SEAL wrote on his personal website last week. “But I would argue that the problem most of the men see is not what the admiral has in mind.”

Higbie made references to a number of recent incidents that have catapulted SEAL teams into the news, and not in any positive way.

One incident involved the drawn-out prosecution of Chief Eddie Gallagher, a SEAL Team 7 member, who was acquitted of serious war crimes recently

The same team was back in the news late last month after one of its platoons was sent home from Iraq after allegedly disobeying orders against drinking alcohol during an Independence Day celebration where it was present.

“The Commander lost confidence in the team’s ability to accomplish the mission,” an official military statement said at the time.

But Higbie says the real problem is with command and, in particular, the hierarchy at the Pentagon which is always first concerned, it seems, with public image than with getting the job done.

“An observer might look at this as ‘what is wrong with the SEAL Teams’ but the real question is; what is wrong with the leadership that has taken the word of terrorists, politicians and over zealous Navy attorneys or investigators that are selling our brave soldiers out?” Higbie wrote.

“I speak from personal experience. In 2009 my platoon captured the infamous ‘butcher of Fallujah’, so well featured in Chris Kyle’s America Sniper movie,” Higbie noted further.

“We were subsequently Courts martialed by fellow commanding SEALs, Wilske and Richards. 3 of the 8 of us initially charged stood full courts martials. Everyone was acquitted as we knew we would be, however the damage was done,” he continued.

His main point is that he and other special operators were trained by the military to be the tip of the spear — to do the deeds and perform the missions that no one else could do or perform — only to be held to unrealistic standards on the back end. You can’t be trained to kill with impunity, he says, while also expected to always have the best behavior.

“The system is broken,” Higbie said. “Do SEALs get a wrap for being cowboys? Hell yes we do, and that’s because we are the ones that raised our hands to do the job that most don’t want to do and even more can’t do, so cut us some slack if we want to have a few beers in Iraq in between gun fights.”

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Higbie noted that this problem isn’t new. However, he said military bureaucrats are increasingly uncomfortable with the realities of special operations warfare and the individuals trained to perform it.

“The SEAL teams have not changed much, the two things that have changed are the political climate around us and the fact that everyone has an iPhone that records every minute of our life,” Higbie noted.

“[W]hen it comes to the battlefield, cut us and quite frankly any other solider who is willing to die for their country some slack,” the veteran wrote. “Every troop should go into battle knowing that no matter what, their commander is behind them if they have to pull that trigger.

“That is not the case now and it is destroying the military,” he said.

Higbie was forced to resign from a post in the Trump administration in January 2018 after less than six months on the job over what the Left-wing media deemed “racist, bigoted” comments regarding blacks, Muslims, and gays.

Regardless, his comments about the PC nature of military leadership, especially in an age of social media — where events can quickly become viral and be taken way out of context — ring true, as most vets will tell you. Image is important, of course, and the American people supporting the military with their taxes deserve moral, upstanding men and women to serve them. But it’s a bit hypocritical to train someone to kill without prejudice and in often very up-close-and-personal ways, then complain about their demeanor.

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